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Category Archives: From The Field

EFF Winner

By in From The Field on on Dec 04, 2015

New York Minute: a short recap of our trip to The Big Apple.

I never truly understood the term “New York Minute” until after my first trip to the city two weeks ago for the Equus Film Festival. From the moment we stepped onto the sidewalk outside of LaGuardia to the moment we boarded the plane heading back home to Dallas, the hurried pace of the city is a common theme…traffic being the only exception! The constant sea of people on the sidewalks, all walking in the same ‘no-nonsense I’ve got places to be’ way, was a stark contrast to the laid-back southern pace I’m used to. New Yorker’s get where they need to go…and quickly!

The weekend was a whirlwind of parties, press-events, screenings, pop-up shops and of course the awards ceremony on the final evening. Our hotel was fairly close to the quaint cinema where the films were being screened so we used the walk to and from as an opportunity to explore a bit of Manhattan.

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Mustian Front 1800

By in From The Field on on May 26, 2015

Behind the Scenes: The Mustian’s Rustic Barn Home.

Who turns an old cinder-block stud barn into a beautiful, rustic home? Brandie and Mike Mustian, that’s who!

The original stud barn at Mickle's Valley View Ranch, before renovation. Photo courtesy of Brandie Mustian.

The original stud barn at Mickle’s Valley View Ranch, before renovation. Photo courtesy of Brandie Mustian.

The front of the barn which is now a fully functional home

The front of the barn which is now a fully functional home

The Mustian’s kept as much of the barn’s original structure as possible.

Mustian Kitchen back 800

The perfect Barn Home Kitchen.

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The T.A Moulton barn - Now being looked after by the U. S. Park Service at home in Grand Teton National Park. Photo Credit: Pamela Kettle

By in From The Field on on Apr 30, 2015

Guest Blogger Chuck Bultman: Saving Orphan Barns

The T. A. Moulton Barn is arguably the most known barn in America. Sitting at the base of the Teton Mountains just north of Jackson Wyoming it is said to be the most photographed barn in the country. So it is no surprise that when Wild About Barns set out to launch a new program about barns, and how people enjoy them, that they started here. And why wouldn’t they? Every picture of this barn, with the mighty Tetons as a backdrop, illustrates the historic importance the barn plays as a small place of shelter in the vast North American landscape.

Barns have an interesting place in the built world. They are icons in the landscape and as such it is easy for us to assume a familiarity, and an expectation. They have been there for as long as you can remember and you expect them to be there long after you are gone. We think of barns not as in the landscape. Instead, like rivers or mountains, they seem part of it – an inseparable part of the countryside, coloring the landscape with distinct personalities. And as a result, they are variously described as timeless, strong, and permanent… but sadly they are not.

There are also many other less well known barns across our country, that have a presence just like the Moulton Barn. They are the old wood barns that line the rural roads of every county in America. These are the barns that draw your eye as you drive down the highway, when you lean over and say, “Hey, there’s a nice one.” These are older barns built before the word ‘pole’ was ever a modifier for ‘barn’. So when I was asked to share my thoughts about the plight of barns today it was those barns that came to my mind. You see, while I am wild about barns too, I am also a bit of a worrier. And I worry because I know what has been happening to barns over the last century.

It is difficult to count all of the older barns in the country but some estimates say there are no fewer than 600,000 barns that date back to 1960 and before. And to some, that may seem like a great many barns. But when I consider that one hundred years ago, when farming was at its height in America, there were approximately six million farms, that number seems frighteningly small.

I do not worry about the Moulton Barn. It is now a part of Grand Teton National Park and has plenty of people looking after it. I do worry about the many many other barns that dot our landscape that are no longer considered useful, for one reason or another, that are just as noble as the Moulton Barn but are not in as striking of a location, and are not being cared for. These are the barns that silently fall prey to the elements. These are the barns that we lose every year.

The Star barn in Middletown PA - Built in 1872 and a landmark on the National Register of Historic Places. Nevertheless, by the beginning of the 21st century the Star barn found itself crowded on three sides by homes, and a mere 70 feet from PA State Route 283 on its fourth. Despite its place on the National Register and the uniqueness of this Greek Revival barn, it's only hope of survival is to move it to another site. That process has begun and the move could possibly be completed in 2016. Photo Credit: TheStarBarn.com

The Star barn in Middletown PA – Built in 1872 and a landmark on the National Register of Historic Places. Nevertheless, by the beginning of the 21st century the Star barn found itself crowded on three sides by homes, and a mere 70 feet from PA State Route 283 on its fourth. Despite its place on the National Register and the uniqueness of this Greek Revival barn, it’s only hope of survival is to move it to another site. That process has begun and the move could possibly be completed in 2016. Photo Credit: TheStarBarn.com

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Char O Lot foal 1800

By in From The Field on on Apr 28, 2015

New Episodes coming soon!

Hey WAB fans!

We would like to Thank each and every one of you that made a pledge and spread the word about our recent Kickstarter campaign. Though our fundraising efforts were unsuccessful, we gained experience and support from so many of you who are working hard with us to ensure that WAB keeps going strong both online and on the air.

We are currently wrapping up post production on a few new episodes for you! Episodes 107-110 will feature some incredible barns! Brothers and talented craftsman turn barns slated for demo into new and amazing design pieces, miniature horses steal our hearts, we explore the Winter Equestrian Festival at Wellington… and so much more!

The Tennessee Barn Project

The Tennessee Barn Project

Miniature horses and their guardian at Little America Miniatures

Miniature horses and their guardian at Little America Miniatures

Winter Equestrian Festival 2015, Wellington FL

Winter Equestrian Festival 2015, Wellington FL

Make sure you stay tuned… announcements will be made when the new episodes have final air dates.

We aren’t going anywhere so keep sharing your barn stories with us and make sure you are following us on Facebook, Instagram, Pinterest and Twitter!

 

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editing

By in From The Field on on Nov 15, 2014

Let the editing begin!

Winter has gripped Dallas for the past few days with temperatures dipping down into the 20s at night. Crazy early for this kind of weather. Luckily, I have escaped to the Texas coast to start editing for Wild About Barns. Me and Carlos (my editor) will be holed up in his condo on the beach for the next week bringing all the barn stories to life. We have a lot of work to do but I am SOOOOOO excited to see the shows come together. We begin airing on RIDE TV in 6 weeks.

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Pamela Trail ride

By in From The Field on on Oct 23, 2014

Time Off

Been a few weeks since we traveled…I’ve enjoyed my time home with the horses, Alice, Tanner Roo and Tan Tan. Dave and I went on a trail ride the other day at Brockdale for 3 hours – it was so fun and the horses enjoyed it too. Of course, we couldn’t walk for a few days after.  Aging is grand!

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By in From The Field on on Oct 19, 2014

1,500 miles

WOW friends, we logged over 1,500 miles on our RV driving through 5 states in 9 days. All to bring the best barn stories we can find in the great American country.

Crew and RV

Ingrid got to shoot clays at The Fork Ranch in Norwood, NC where every Spring, they hold the Olympic Trials for 3-day eventing. Jim the owner of The Fork is a true Southern gentleman. He spent the day driving us all over his 1,000 farm where he has a conservation easement so the farm will never be developed. (more…)

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